Anthropology

The most scientific of the humanities and the most humanistic of the sciences.

anthropology

Anthropology is the study of what it means to be human in diverse societies around the world today, and how people interact with and change their environments. We look at humanity from different angles including social and cultural as well as biological and evolutionary perspectives.

Anthropology is interested in all aspects of people’s lives; their habits, beliefs, rituals and myths. By studying the everyday details of people’s lives, anthropologists explore what makes us uniquely human and so culturally diverse.

Studying Anthropology will offer you the chance to grapple with these fundamental questions and appreciate topical debates about personal identity, human rights, development, globalisation, sustainability and ethnic conflict. You will be introduced to key ideas and critical reasoning skills which complement many A level subjects in the humanities and social and human sciences.

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“Every lesson, in Anthropology, I am encouraged to debate and evaluate the content we learn about. The subject itself is very rich, we learn about cultures across the world and examine issues and theories which relate to us all. I fell in love with subject straight away and I am continuing my study of it at Goldsmiths University”.

Matilda Rodway ex Helenswood School, Hastings

TOPICS COVERED

as

Unit 1: Being Human: Unity and Diversity

  • The biological and cultural significance of the human body
  • Thinking and communicating
  • Kinship and organising social relations
  • Commodities and exchange
  • Engaging with nature

Unit 2: Becoming a Person: Identity and Belonging

  • Ideas of personhood
  • Rites of passage (childhood, adulthood, aging, death)
  • Gender and sexuality
  • Creating an identity
  • Drawing boundaries between humans animals and cyborgs
  • Exclusion and discrimination

a2

Unit 3: Global and Local: Societies, Environments and Globalisation

  • The historical movement of people
  • Understanding globalisation – its forms and effects
  • Perspectives on local responses to global processes including development and human rights
  • Changing identities
  • Impacts on the environment

Unit 4: Practising Anthropology: Methods and Investigations

  • Research methods and theory in Anthropology
  • The use of objects in museums
  • The chance to conduct a smallscale anthropological investigation, assessed by means of an external written examination

FACTS

COURSES AVAILABLE


AS, A2

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS


As for all advanced courses including C grade or above in English Language GCSE

HOW THE COURSES ARE ASSESSED


AS & A2: 100% exam

EXAMBOARD


AQA

WHERE DOES IT LEAD?


Anthropology is a rapidly growing Higher Education choice, but the A level will be good preparation for a range of higher education courses in the social and human sciences and humanities. Careers involving working with or for people.

ENQUIRIES


Ruth Grier and Lee Gray

OTHER INFORMATION


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